September 29th, 2014

Food, Culture & Community: Hotel Tango Whiskey

by Andrew Christenberry

Last Friday I got a call from one of my friends who had an itch for a bit of Fletcher Place nightlife. I, feeling the itch myself, agreed without any hesitation. My friend pulled up a few minutes later on his newly purchased Suzuki 350 motorcycle. He tossed me a helmet, I hopped on, and […]

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September 26th, 2014

Repairing Damage with “the World’s Greatest Toy”

by Emmett Gienapp

You want to know about a good way to make $12? Just grab a big box of Legos, drive downtown, find a hole in the wall of some dilapidated building, and sit down for three hours to repair the damage with the world’s greatest toy. At least, that’s what I tried. I wanted to do […]

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September 25th, 2014

“A City to Live” by Jed Dorsey

by Andrew Christenberry

Throughout the month of September, Indianapolis immigrant Jed Dorsey has constructed an adventure with nothing but his brushes, some paint, and a few canvases. Now, as fall has briskly arrived, and summer has all but bid us farewell, it’s time to reminisce a bit on what once was and what is now. Time is the […]

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September 23rd, 2014

The City as Classroom

by cgindy

The Kennedy Center has spent years studying the best ways to help make the arts an integral part of all of our lives.  As they have looked at the school experience, their research continues to show that students learn best in environments where learning “is active and experiential, reflective, social, evolving, and focused on problem-solving. […]

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September 19th, 2014

Food, Culture & Community: Duos “Slow Fast Food”

by Jeshua Harris, high school intern

Yesterday I sat down to a wonderful lunch with my intern boss, Andrew Christenberry at Duos Kitchen. Located at 2960 N. Meridian Street in the International Medical Group building, Duos serves a refreshing spin off of slow cooked soul food that they call “slow fast food.” When you walk up to either of their two locations (the other located 720 Eskenazi Ave.), […]

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September 16th, 2014

You LIVE here?

by Emily Andrews

If you came to September’s First Friday at the Harrison Center for the Arts in the Old Northside and stopped by the studio right beside the gymnasium, you may have been one of the numerous people who toured my studio, saw a pull out couch and an Eno hammock hanging from the rafters and asked, […]

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September 10th, 2014

Remembering Summers in King Park

by Emily Vanest

  Patric’s grandmother’s house in the early years  A few months ago, as we were telling a group of Indianapolis leaders about our current art show celebrating the King Park neighborhood, a young woman in the middle of the crowd called out, “I grew up coming to this neighborhood.” As she began describing what the […]

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September 9th, 2014

Hoosiers

by Emmett Gienapp

I’ve been called a lot of things over the years. Dork. Geek. Nerd. Socially-incompetent lover of all things Pokemon. I was really popular in middle and high school. Eventually, I learned to embrace it all because it’s perfectly acceptable to be those things in college. College is the great equalizer that grade school never could […]

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September 8th, 2014

Intersecting Avenues – Lobyn Hamilton

by cgindy

If music truly is the food of love, Lobyn Hamilton is a master chef…but not in the way you might think. Hamilton is an Indianapolis native, and a visual lover of music. He is known primarily for utilizing the shards of vinyl records in his artwork. Through this melodious medium, Hamilton brings us his commemorations […]

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September 5th, 2014

Has Your Opinion Been Heard?

by Alex Miser

You often hear people say that Indianapolis is a big, small town, referencing that the circle of stakeholders and people influencing the future of the city is open and diverse.  But, make no mistake about it, Indianapolis is a BIG city. Indianapolis is 373 square miles. To put that into perspective, the city limits of […]

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